California Town Hosts Victims of Camp Fire for Thanksgiving

For the victims of this years deadly California wildfires, it may not feel like there is much to be thankful for. More than 11,000 homes were destroyed in fires this year, and over 79 people killed in the deadliest fire ever recorded in California. Even with predicted rainstorms bringing much needed rain to the dry brush, these storms also promise deadly and destructive mudslides yet to come.

Yet a Sacramento suburb, Lincoln, is making an effort to bring a little light and hope to these victims. Local residents have gathered together to give up their holidays, and spend their time helping these victims still have theirs. 

Jeannette Bermudez, one of the initial organizers of the holiday feast for fire victims, watched the devastation caused by the Camp Fire with her 9 year old son who was home due to school closures from the smoke. While they watched, he asked her what they were going to do about it. In a spur of the moment decision, she decided to host Thanksgiving Dinner for those left with nothing, and made a Facebook post about it.

The small town of just 47,000 people answered her call, and big time. The fire department got involved and held a drive that garnered over 100 turkeys for the event. Businesses and restaurants donated everything from food to toys and games for the event. The city of Lincoln itself even donated the event location completely free for the day.

Even a local dog groomer is getting involved, inviting fire victims to drop their dog off for free puppy-sitting during the feast, and a free bath and groom so their dogs will come back fresh and clean. After enduring the soot and smoke of sometimes very close escapes, it is a welcome relief for fire victims of the four footed kind as well.

Many more volunteers will be giving up Thanksgiving day itself, foregoing their own dinners so they can serve the people who need a little holiday cheer the most. For those who have lost everything, sometimes even loved ones as well as houses and everything that makes them a home, this Thanksgiving feast couldn't come at a better time. 

Paradise was a retirement community for the most part, and consisted mostly of people over the age of 65. Paradise had no official business, and was simply a refuge for people who couldn't afford California's sky high housing market. At this point in time, no one even know if Paradise will be able to rebuild, or if mudslides will claim even more lives and properties as rain begins to cool the flames.

At least one day however, they can sit down with family and friends, and eat a turkey feast knowing that the town of Lincoln will be there to help them through these difficult times, now, and in the future too. It is a truly beautiful expression of what family and community is all about, and hopefully will result in lifelong friendships forged this holiday season.